Posts Tagged ‘Jon Skovron’

Year in Numbers:

100 books!!!!, yes finally hit the elusive 100 books on the last day of the year, spanning over 36K pages and an average rating of 3.8

80 authors for the year with 49 new authors amongst them

25% of books read, written by women (getting there, getting there, slowly and steadily)

7 books abandoned, 5 books pushed out. Overall success rate – 89%

 

In Detail:

2016 turned out to be quite the year for some really good books. With the absence of some of the heavy hitters turning out their stuff, it also turned to be a year where a lot of stuff which would have normally gotten hidden in the shadows, shone brightly. Personally, this was a year where I read a lot more science fiction than what I have done so far. I still cannot get myself to read the older SF stuff but to be fair, that’s an issue for most of my reads in other genres. I hardly made a dent in my significant backlog list (or Mount TBR) with over 80% of my reads for the year being 2016 publications. Even in those 20%, a good chunk was read since the sequels/ spinoffs/ sidequels (word of the year following seqoot from last year) were printed in 2016. Continuing with the theme from last year, my Goodreads shelves got incredibly organized with a 2016-tbr and a 2016-read shelf as well.(Something that is quite likely to shock people who know me).

 

As said before, 2016 turned out to be really good for books and my best-of-the year shelf just kept on stacking up right from the start of the year. Given that, it’s just an impossible task to reduce it to 10 books (the holy number) and it just made a whole lot of sense to showcase the 18 books that really stood out for various reasons. As with most lists, it’s highly subjective and personal, and beware as you proceed in deep. In no particular order, barring the 1st one

 

  1. Morning Star (Red Rising #3) – BOOK OF THE YEAR – Pierce Brown:

Read this if you love: fast-paced operatic tales of revenge, heartbreak, bitter-bitter-bitter-sweetness and class struggles

morning-star

(Review)

 

  1. Behind the Throne (The Indranan War #1) – KB Wagers:

Read this if you always wondered how an actual kid of Princess Leia (Carrie Fisher RIP) and Han Solo would turn out to be (not that whiny petulant Kylo Ren); For a kickass female lead who shoots first, ask questions later, if you wanted elements of Indian mythology and culture to figure in space operas

behind-the-throne

(Review)

 

  1. City of Blades (The Divine Cities #2) – Robert Jackson Bennet:

Read this if you want a sense of magic, mystery and majesty in your stories, if you believe in a rich tapestry of broken dreams

city-of-blades

(Review)

 

  1. A Closed & Common Orbit (Wayfarers #2) – Becky Chambers:

Read this if you want a rich, positive, hopeful, uplifting experience based on love, longing, loss, identity and redemption

a-closed-common-orbit

(Review)

 

  1. Crooked Kingdom (Six of Crows #2) – Leigh Bardugo:

Read this if you want a gritty, bloody adventure, plotting and counter plotting and a collection of rogues

crooked-kingdom

(Review)

 

  1. Dragon Hunters (The Chronicles of the Exile #2) – Marc Turner:

Read this if you like the Malazan series, large set of characters, back-stabbings and betrayals and dysfunctional families

dragon-hunters

(Review)

 

  1. The Everything Box (Another Coop Heist #1) – Richard Kadrey:

Read this if you love fast-paced heists, Locke Lamora without the grittiness, and smart wordplay

the-everything-box

(Review)

 

  1. Fellside – MR Carey:

Read this for an exploration of unresolved guilt, redemption and if Arkham was populated by non-super-villains

fellside

(Review)

 

  1. Fool’s Gold (The Dragon Lords #1) – Jon Hollins:

Read this if you want to have a rollicking good time with a supremely crazy team, insanely humorous chapter titles and as the book says “Guardians of the Galaxy meets the Hobbit”

fools-gold

(Review)

 

  1. Hell Divers (Hell Divers Trilogy #1) – Nicholas Sansbury Smith:

Read this if you love post-apocalyptic tales of human survival, broken characters pushing for honor and duty, Snow Piercer and Reign of Fire

hell-divers

(Review)

 

  1. Hope & Red (Empire of Storms #1) – Jon Skovron:

Read this for a rousing tale of gritty revenge, and mismatched duos with reversal of gender tropes

hope-red

(Review)

 

  1. The Immortals (Olympus Bound #1) – Jordanna Max Brodsky:

Read this if you like American Gods, Greek & Roman mythology and the duality of Gods & Men with a bit of a classic whodunit

the-immortals

(Review)

 

  1. The Last Mortal Bond (Chronicle of the Unhewn Throne #3) – Brian Staveley:

Read this if you love to read about dysfunctional siblings jockeying for power and epic harsh and gritty endings

the-last-mortal-bond

(Review)

 

  1. Mechanical Failure (Epic Failure #1) – Joe Zieja:

Read this if you love the absurdities in Catch-22, military bureaucratic stupidity, selfish characters turned heroic selfish characters, homicidal robotic barbers and malfunctioning profanity communicators

mechanical-failure

(Review)

 

  1. No Good Dragon Goes Unpunished (Heartstrikers #3) – Rachel Aaron:

Read this if you think democracy is a bad idea, love an abundance of scheming family members, and distrust dealing with the devil

no-good-dragon-goes-unpunished

(Review)

 

  1. Poison City (London Tau #1) – Paul Crilley:

Read this if you love South Africa, urban legends, world weary, broken yet driven detective and wise-cracking, snarky, sherry swilling dogs

poison-city

(Review)

 

  1. Saint’s Blood (Greatcoats #3) – Sebastian De Castell:

Read this for swashbuckling swordplay and a love for 3 musketeers, fascinating team dynamics and willingness to dive headlong into suicidal rescue acts

saints-blood

(Review)

 

  1. The Wheel of Osheim (The Red Queen’s War #3) – Mark Lawrence:

Almost the book of the year as well, Read this if you love complex characters who are unlike any character you have read so far, black humor, non-linear storytelling and insane reactions to escape from hell

the-wheel-of-osheim

(Review)

 

 

Other Honorable mentions (in no particular order)

  1. Stiletto (The Checquy Files #2) – Daniel O’Malley: Read if you are a fan of Deliberate plotting, Brit sense of humor, slightly icky creepy events (Review)
  2. This Savage Song (Monsters of Verity #1) – Victoria Schwab: Read if you want to read Romeo & Juliet without the romance and with monsters (Review)
  3. Burned (Alex Verus #7) – Benedict Jacka: Read for London based time magic done right and for a thrilling on-the-run book (Review)
  4. Nevernight (The Nevernight Chronicle #1) – Jay Kristoff: Read if you wish Hogwarts had a bunch of sociopathic teenagers training to be assassins (Review)
  5. Time Siege (Time Salvager #2) – Wesley Chu: Read for the consequences of breaking the rules of time travel and broken characters (Review)
  6. A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic #2) – VE Schwab: Read for portal travel among multiple Londons and a kick-ass piratical female lead who breaks convention at every turn (Review)
  7. The Rise of Io – Wesley Chu: Read if you like voices in your head, plucky characters punching way above their weight and for tales based in the Indian sub-continent (Review)