Posts Tagged ‘Rachel Aaron’

Year in Numbers:

100 books!!!!, yes finally hit the elusive 100 books on the last day of the year, spanning over 36K pages and an average rating of 3.8

80 authors for the year with 49 new authors amongst them

25% of books read, written by women (getting there, getting there, slowly and steadily)

7 books abandoned, 5 books pushed out. Overall success rate – 89%

 

In Detail:

2016 turned out to be quite the year for some really good books. With the absence of some of the heavy hitters turning out their stuff, it also turned to be a year where a lot of stuff which would have normally gotten hidden in the shadows, shone brightly. Personally, this was a year where I read a lot more science fiction than what I have done so far. I still cannot get myself to read the older SF stuff but to be fair, that’s an issue for most of my reads in other genres. I hardly made a dent in my significant backlog list (or Mount TBR) with over 80% of my reads for the year being 2016 publications. Even in those 20%, a good chunk was read since the sequels/ spinoffs/ sidequels (word of the year following seqoot from last year) were printed in 2016. Continuing with the theme from last year, my Goodreads shelves got incredibly organized with a 2016-tbr and a 2016-read shelf as well.(Something that is quite likely to shock people who know me).

 

As said before, 2016 turned out to be really good for books and my best-of-the year shelf just kept on stacking up right from the start of the year. Given that, it’s just an impossible task to reduce it to 10 books (the holy number) and it just made a whole lot of sense to showcase the 18 books that really stood out for various reasons. As with most lists, it’s highly subjective and personal, and beware as you proceed in deep. In no particular order, barring the 1st one

 

  1. Morning Star (Red Rising #3) – BOOK OF THE YEAR – Pierce Brown:

Read this if you love: fast-paced operatic tales of revenge, heartbreak, bitter-bitter-bitter-sweetness and class struggles

morning-star

(Review)

 

  1. Behind the Throne (The Indranan War #1) – KB Wagers:

Read this if you always wondered how an actual kid of Princess Leia (Carrie Fisher RIP) and Han Solo would turn out to be (not that whiny petulant Kylo Ren); For a kickass female lead who shoots first, ask questions later, if you wanted elements of Indian mythology and culture to figure in space operas

behind-the-throne

(Review)

 

  1. City of Blades (The Divine Cities #2) – Robert Jackson Bennet:

Read this if you want a sense of magic, mystery and majesty in your stories, if you believe in a rich tapestry of broken dreams

city-of-blades

(Review)

 

  1. A Closed & Common Orbit (Wayfarers #2) – Becky Chambers:

Read this if you want a rich, positive, hopeful, uplifting experience based on love, longing, loss, identity and redemption

a-closed-common-orbit

(Review)

 

  1. Crooked Kingdom (Six of Crows #2) – Leigh Bardugo:

Read this if you want a gritty, bloody adventure, plotting and counter plotting and a collection of rogues

crooked-kingdom

(Review)

 

  1. Dragon Hunters (The Chronicles of the Exile #2) – Marc Turner:

Read this if you like the Malazan series, large set of characters, back-stabbings and betrayals and dysfunctional families

dragon-hunters

(Review)

 

  1. The Everything Box (Another Coop Heist #1) – Richard Kadrey:

Read this if you love fast-paced heists, Locke Lamora without the grittiness, and smart wordplay

the-everything-box

(Review)

 

  1. Fellside – MR Carey:

Read this for an exploration of unresolved guilt, redemption and if Arkham was populated by non-super-villains

fellside

(Review)

 

  1. Fool’s Gold (The Dragon Lords #1) – Jon Hollins:

Read this if you want to have a rollicking good time with a supremely crazy team, insanely humorous chapter titles and as the book says “Guardians of the Galaxy meets the Hobbit”

fools-gold

(Review)

 

  1. Hell Divers (Hell Divers Trilogy #1) – Nicholas Sansbury Smith:

Read this if you love post-apocalyptic tales of human survival, broken characters pushing for honor and duty, Snow Piercer and Reign of Fire

hell-divers

(Review)

 

  1. Hope & Red (Empire of Storms #1) – Jon Skovron:

Read this for a rousing tale of gritty revenge, and mismatched duos with reversal of gender tropes

hope-red

(Review)

 

  1. The Immortals (Olympus Bound #1) – Jordanna Max Brodsky:

Read this if you like American Gods, Greek & Roman mythology and the duality of Gods & Men with a bit of a classic whodunit

the-immortals

(Review)

 

  1. The Last Mortal Bond (Chronicle of the Unhewn Throne #3) – Brian Staveley:

Read this if you love to read about dysfunctional siblings jockeying for power and epic harsh and gritty endings

the-last-mortal-bond

(Review)

 

  1. Mechanical Failure (Epic Failure #1) – Joe Zieja:

Read this if you love the absurdities in Catch-22, military bureaucratic stupidity, selfish characters turned heroic selfish characters, homicidal robotic barbers and malfunctioning profanity communicators

mechanical-failure

(Review)

 

  1. No Good Dragon Goes Unpunished (Heartstrikers #3) – Rachel Aaron:

Read this if you think democracy is a bad idea, love an abundance of scheming family members, and distrust dealing with the devil

no-good-dragon-goes-unpunished

(Review)

 

  1. Poison City (London Tau #1) – Paul Crilley:

Read this if you love South Africa, urban legends, world weary, broken yet driven detective and wise-cracking, snarky, sherry swilling dogs

poison-city

(Review)

 

  1. Saint’s Blood (Greatcoats #3) – Sebastian De Castell:

Read this for swashbuckling swordplay and a love for 3 musketeers, fascinating team dynamics and willingness to dive headlong into suicidal rescue acts

saints-blood

(Review)

 

  1. The Wheel of Osheim (The Red Queen’s War #3) – Mark Lawrence:

Almost the book of the year as well, Read this if you love complex characters who are unlike any character you have read so far, black humor, non-linear storytelling and insane reactions to escape from hell

the-wheel-of-osheim

(Review)

 

 

Other Honorable mentions (in no particular order)

  1. Stiletto (The Checquy Files #2) – Daniel O’Malley: Read if you are a fan of Deliberate plotting, Brit sense of humor, slightly icky creepy events (Review)
  2. This Savage Song (Monsters of Verity #1) – Victoria Schwab: Read if you want to read Romeo & Juliet without the romance and with monsters (Review)
  3. Burned (Alex Verus #7) – Benedict Jacka: Read for London based time magic done right and for a thrilling on-the-run book (Review)
  4. Nevernight (The Nevernight Chronicle #1) – Jay Kristoff: Read if you wish Hogwarts had a bunch of sociopathic teenagers training to be assassins (Review)
  5. Time Siege (Time Salvager #2) – Wesley Chu: Read for the consequences of breaking the rules of time travel and broken characters (Review)
  6. A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic #2) – VE Schwab: Read for portal travel among multiple Londons and a kick-ass piratical female lead who breaks convention at every turn (Review)
  7. The Rise of Io – Wesley Chu: Read if you like voices in your head, plucky characters punching way above their weight and for tales based in the Indian sub-continent (Review)

 

 

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Wow, that’s quite a delayed post innit. Almost half of 2016 gone and this post comes up now. Well, between travel, a couple of personal changes and time to settle in, and of course, the reading for 2016 and also laziness (never forget that), the last few months have pretty much been a blur, leaving hardly any time to write.

 

There is this phrase being used called Peak TV. Basically there is so much television to watch across so many channels (the medium), that its insanely impossible to catch up with all the great television being produced. In a way that is true for genre fiction as well. There are just so many, so many books out there, no matter how much you read, you can barely put a dent in your TBR (To-Be-Read) Mountain. My personal tally was 90 books for 2015, no mean tally (in all modesty :P) and yet, there are books left by the roadside that possibly I will get to someday. On a side note, my TBR shelf has gotten so unmanageable, that I have had to create a subfolder called Priority Backlist to prioritize within TBR itself. The other side effect of having so many releases to catch up per week has forced me to be organized for the first time in my life. I started creating yearly lists to read and also to capture what has been read (My 2016 TBR Shelf, 2016 Read Shelf). As I have mentioned in my posts in previous years (here and here), my reading habits have become extremely contemporary, with almost 90% of what I read being something that is released in the current year. Only in cases where a later book in a series I do want to catch up comes out, do I go back in time to read.

 

Physical books seem to be making a comeback according to quite a few reports. If that happens, that’s quite the reversal when the death of physical books was shouted from everywhere once ebooks starts gaining prominence and relevance. It may be a temporary fightback since the future is pretty much going to be digital. From my side, I barely read 3 physical books. Else, it has all been ebooks. As I never get tired of saying, the sheer convenience of able to read a book anywhere using a device that is with you the most (the phone) and the ability to seamlessly sync across devices, makes ebooks a winner.

 

2015 saw an amazing number of fantastic releases on paper and to a great extent, they lived up to it. What I have below is my curated, supremely subjective, extremely unscientific list of the best 2015 had to offer. While I do have the books in no particular order below, some books in this list will remain very close to my heart and for various reasons that I will detail below.

 

1. Red Rising/ Golden Son – Pierce Brown : Read this: If you love fast-paced operatic tales of revenge , class struggle and brutal twists

Golden Son

Easily, the best read of the year. My review description for the book read as follows, “If Lord of the Flies, Ender’s Game and the Hunger Games had a ménage a trios (with a helping hand from The Count of Monte Cristo) and produced an offspring, that would be this book” and I see no reason to change the description. Both books are brutal. Fundamentally trying to engineer a revolution, the class struggle led by the hidden agent, the chief protagonist Darrow, is a brutal read. Pierce Brown crafts an absolutely fascinating world and an eternal timeless struggle. With an absolutely unputdownable pace, compelling storytelling and bloody brutal violent twists, The Red Rising series is well on its way to be rated as an absolutely brilliant modern great

 

 

2. The Liar’s Key (The Red Queen’s War #2) – Mark Lawrence – Read this: If you love complex characters who you love to hate but can’t. Also, for black humor-based one-liners

Liar's Key

 

Mark Lawrence has yet to write a bad book and it’s amazing how he manages to craft a compelling lead out of the dregs that humanity has to offer and humanizes then. Jorg was an easy character to hate and yet root for. But Jalan (the lead character here) is different. He is a coward, a womanizer, selfish, capricious, a lush and yet Lawrence adds layer on layer to him, making what on paper seems an uni-dimensional character, greater. That is not to say Jalan becomes a hero, fair from it but there is something underneath that is shaped by circumstances past and present. Humor is never far away but the undertone is always gallow.

 

 

3. Fool’s Quest (The Fitz and The Fool #2) – Robin Hobb – Read this: If you love reading highly emotional, beautiful writing and deeply flawed, human and complex characters

 

Fools Quest

This book is truly wonderfully special as it has THAT Fitz moment we have waited, 8 books and (since I read the Farseer trilogy in 2005) 10 years for. But with that moment comes the dread, as you know any moment of high for Fitz pretty much leads to a debilitating low and that’s pretty much what happens. Robin Hobb remains one of those authors who will use 10 words when 1 would suffice and that hardly matters. You could have her write down a shopping list and I would read it. Exquisitely beautiful.

 

 

4. Escape from Baghdad – Saad Hossain – Read this: If you love Catch-22 and Three Kings, and want a slightly more accessible, relatable book detailing a war from our times

 

Escape from Baghdad

The best stand-alone book of the year, Escape from Baghdad is a fantastic book that almost brings to the life the absurdity, the hidden political allegory and anger of the movie, 3 Kings and Brian K Vaughan’s The Pride of Baghdad. You don’t need to be a genre fiction fan to pick this up. The book combines black gallows humor with a dose of slapstick and buffoonery associated with the inept, bumbling characters and war profiteering and chicanery in the simmering cauldron of Baghdad. The city’s history and mythology serves as a fantastic supporting character in this fabulous madcap tale

 

 

5. Nice Dragons Finish Last/ One Good Dragon Deserves Another (Heartstrikers series) – Rachel Aaron – Read this: If you love dragons, fast paced stories and underdogs. Also, if you love dysfunctional families

 

Rachel Aaron crafts a fantastic and fascinating world where dragons exist and can take human form. In this world, she introduces Julius Heartstriker, the youngest of the clan, a lazy, cowardly dragon locked in human form by the Heartstriker matriarch as a punishment for being totally useless. What follows is a breathtaking journey of politics and betrayal amidst intricate world building. With a no-hold-barred plotting, selfish and mad matriarchs, madder seers, there is hardly a dull moment in this action packed, humorous tale

 

 

6. The Providence of Fire (Chronicle of the Unhewn Throne #2) – Brian Staveley – Read this: If you love dysfunctional families and old-fashioned epic fantasy

 

Providence of Fire

Who doesn’t love dysfunctional siblings trying to kill, for a throne, manipulated by outside interests? Staveley’s debut novel was pretty much old wine in a new bottle. What Staveley does right is to address the justified criticism of the 1st book where the female lead got the short shrift. Here, Adare gets an equal role to her brothers as she learns what it means to be a politician and a ruler. The overarching stakes are revealed even as the invisible puppet masters reveal themselves slowly.  Staveley has got an easy pace and style of writing. This is truly epic fantasy done right and in the new age style

 

 

7. The Aeronaut’s Windlass – Jim Butcher – Read this: If you love air battles, new magic systems, non-stop action and cats!!!

 

Aeronauts Windlass

Butcher writes for the fans in all of us and he doesn’t disappoint with his new series. Set in a steampunk setting in a world built on spires, the non-stop thrill a minute entertainer hits the ground running (bad pun given we have air ships here). He introduces a motley bunch, juggles the POVs well and even has time to indulge in cat dramatics. As always, packed with humor and thrills, this looks like another winner and a series to stay

 

 

8. The Autumn Republic (Powder Mage #3) – Brian McClellan – Read this: If you love Brandon Sanderson style of storytelling and bitter-sweet endings

 

Autumn Republic

An epic conclusion to the Powder Mage trilogy, the final book does not disappoint. The pace is as frenetic as ever but not at the expense of character development. The body count is high, the action is exhilarating and exhausting and the end is typically epic and satisfying. Gut wrenching and moving, even if you see the end coming from when the 1st book started. A tale that encompasses gods, mortals and privileged, the battle scenes are top notch and the politicking is clever.

 

 

9. The Prophecy Con/ The Paladin Caper (Rogues of the Republic series) – Patrick Weekes – Read this: If you love Ocean’s 11, Lies of Locke Lamora, large and non-homogenous cast, witty asides and sarcastic retorts

 

Clever, wonderful, cute and entertaining, this is one of those books that you pick up and read when you are alone. Because if you read it in a public space, you cannot stop laughing out loud and thereby earning quite a few concerned glances directed towards you. The cast is really juggled immensely well and everyone gets a chance to shine. The pacing is breathtaking (literally as well) and the series ends quite neatly as well

 

 

10. Knight’s Shadow (Greatcoats #2) – Sebastian de Castell – Read this: If you love 3 Musketeers, swashbuckling swordplay, first person narrative and humor

 

Knights Shadow

Knight’s Shadow forced me to think up a new genre – the grindark. There is just enough humor packed in the narrative to hide the darkness that permeates through the book. Continuing in vein of book 1, our intrepid band of Greatcoats try to fulfill their dead king’s wishes even as the country rebel against them and pretty much tries to go up in flames. The action sequences are details and fantastic. The swordplay sequences are quite intimate and in your face and fast. The character dynamics are supremely awesome and each character has such a unique voice. The betrayals are hard and deadly and make this an entirely compelling read

 

 

Almost in top 10 (in no particular order)

 

  1. Gemini Cell – Myke Cole :Read this: if you like military fantasy, unique magic systems and conspiracies

Gemini Cell

 

  1. The Rebirths of Tao (Tao #3) – Wesley Chu:Read this: if you are a desk-bound internet warrior who dreams of saving the world and if you like voices in your head

Rebirths of Tao

 

  1. Generation V/ Iron Night/ Tainted Blood/ Dark Ascension (Generation V) – ML Brennan:Read this: if you like non-Twilighty Vampires, The Godfather and dysfunctional families

 

  1. Dark Run – Mike Brooks :Read this: if you like Firefly, space operas and awesome fun team dynamics

Dark Run

 

  1. Wake of Vultures (The Shadow #1) – Lila Bowen:Read this: if you like the wild, wild and weird westerns and kick-ass non-conformist female leads

Wake of Vultures

My Goodreads shelf for 2015